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Transforming local NHS services in Fareham

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GP practices in Fareham, Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust and Fareham and Gosport CCG are working together to improve NHS services in your area.

In the beginning of December 2016 we launched a six week online survey seeking the views of people living in Fareham on local GP services. These views will be used to help us ensure GP services meet the needs of local people.


Overarching themes
The overarching themes from the survey results are: 

  • The vast majority of respondents are happy to see a GP other than their own or experienced nurse for both same day and routine advice and care unless, for some respondents, their GP has specifically asked them to come back
  • Half of respondents are happy to see a pharmacist but there is a lack of understanding in the knowledge and skills held by these staff
  • A significant proportion are happy to be seen at a practice other than their own for both same day and routine advice and care
  • Respondents are happy to travel with the majority prepared to travel up to five miles and some over 10 miles
  • The vast majority are happy to speak to a health professional over the phone with half being happy to use alternative ways such as email and web-based consultations.


Who replied to our survey?
The survey was completed by 937 people registered at the 10 practices in the Fareham MCP Locality. A further 82 people responded and selected ‘Other’ for their GP practice. Of the 937 local respondents: 

  • 63% of respondents are female
  • 2% of respondents are 24 years old or younger, 36% are 25 to 54 years old, 53% are 55 to 74 years old and 9% are over 75 years old
  • 41% have a long term condition
  • 12% care for dependent children and 10% are responsible for caring for a parent/friend/relative
  • Every practice in the Fareham MCP Locality had responses from patients registered with them.  

What did they say about when they feel they need to be seen on the same day?
Most would be happy seeing a GP other than their own (92%) or an experienced nurse (81%). Over half (63%) would be happy to see another health care professional, such as a physiotherapist and half (50%) would be happy seeing a pharmacist. The key themes for lack of confidence in pharmacists were people not seeing them as qualified as their GP or nurse, and being unable to help someone in a shop setting. A small number (20%) only want to see their GP.

These results were reflected in responses from those who have a long term condition apart from a slightly lower number (60%) would be happy to see another health care professional, such as a physiotherapist; and less than half (46%) would be happy to see a pharmacist. However, for those caring for an adult only 74% would be happy to see an experienced nurse; 56% would be happy to see another health care professional, such as a physiotherapist; and 40% would be happy to see a pharmacist. A slightly higher number of carers for children (96%) are happy to see a GP other than their own; an experienced nurse (87%); or another health care professional, such as a physiotherapist (67%).

The majority (64%) of respondents would be happy to be seen somewhere other than their own practice if they needed a same day appointment. This was reflected in the responses from those with a long term condition. A higher number of carers for children (75%) would be happy to be seen somewhere else whilst less (52%) carers for adults would be.

Those who said they would be happy to be seen elsewhere would be prepared to travel up to five miles (60%) with some prepared to travel up to 10 miles (18%). This was reflected in the responses from those with a long term condition. However, a higher number of those caring for children (67%) would be happy to travel one to five miles. Responses from those caring for adults showed that less (51%) would be prepared to travel one to five miles or up to 10 miles (13%). 


What did they say about when they need routine advice or care?
Most would be happy seeing a GP other than their own (89%) or an experienced nurse (82%). Over half (63%) would be happy to see another health care professional, such as a physiotherapist, and just over half (53%) would be happy seeing a pharmacist. As before, the key themes for lack of confidence in pharmacists were people not seeing them as qualified as their GP or nurse, and being unable to help someone in a shop setting. A small number (26%) only want to see their GP. 

These results were reflected in responses from those who have a long term condition apart from a slightly lower number (59%) who would be happy to see another health care professional, such as a physiotherapist; and less than half (48%) would be happy to see a pharmacist. A slightly higher number (68%) of carers for children would be happy to see another health care professional, such as a physiotherapist. There was a slight difference in responses from those who care for an adult with less (73%) being happy to see an experienced nurse; 49% being happy to see another health care professional, such as a physiotherapist; and  31% being happy to see a pharmacist.

A significant proportion of respondents (61%) would be happy to be seen somewhere other than their own practice if they needed a routine appointment. However, fewer patients with a long term condition (56%) would be happy to be seen elsewhere. A higher number (74%) of those caring for a child would be happy to be seen elsewhere but less for those caring for an adult (47%).

Those who said they would be happy to be seen elsewhere would be prepared to travel up to five miles (65%) with some prepared to travel up to 10 miles (19%). This was reflected in the responses from those with a long term condition that are happy to be seen elsewhere.  A higher number of those caring for children would be prepared to travel up to five miles (69%) but less up to 10 miles (16%). Less people caring for adults (59%) would be prepared to travel up to five miles but more (26%) would be prepared to travel up to 10 miles.


What did they say about how they are seen?
Most (89%) said they would be happy to talk to a healthcare professional over the phone; 47% said they’d be happy to use online communication, such as Skype; 48% would be happy to have a consultation by email; 45% would be happy to have a web-based consultation; and 44% would be happy to have a real-time online conversation. These results were the same for both when patients felt they need to be seen on the same day or when they need routine advice or care.

Overall these results were reflected in those received from those with a long term condition with less being happy to have a web-based consultation (39%) and real-time online conversation (39%). However, those caring for a child would be happy to use alternative communications with 89% happy to talk to a health care professional over the phone when they feel they need treatment or advice on the same day. Likewise they would be happy to use alternative communications, for both urgent and routine issues with 55% happy to use online communication, such as Skype; 53% happy to have a consultation by email; 55% happy to have a web-based consultation; and 56% happy to have a real-time online conversation. Those caring for an adult would be less happy to use alternative communications, for both urgent and routine issues, with 85% happy to talk to a health care professional over the phone; 50% happy to use online communication, such as Skype; 46% happy to have a consultation by email; 40% happy to have a web-based consultation; and 38% happy to have a real-time online conversation.